8 Self-Care Tips to Help Manage Mental Illness in the Summer

A lot of the time I try to ignore my mental health in favor of my own internal stubbornness and pressure to be productive. That’s not healthy. Sometimes, you just gotta put whatever you’re doing down and give yourself time to breathe.

Don’t feel guilty for taking time for yourself. If you need the time, take it. There’s always tomorrow.

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Yes, You’re A “Real” Writer

The definition of what a writer is has been debated within the writing community for ages. What are the parameters? What do you have to have accomplished in order to be considered one? Do you have to finish a novel? Publish something? Get picked up by one of the Big Five houses? Do you need to be on the New York Times bestseller list?

But here’s the thing: if you think you’re a writer, you are one.

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Story Snippet: June

He has never found a place that feels like home. He’s lived in this house for over a year, can count all the cracks on his bedroom ceiling. He knows where the floorboards creak and where the old stairs dip. The flashing lights and heavy bass thudding through the room might be the most familiar […]

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7 Tips to Help You Write Authentically (Without Putting Yourself in the Story)

Two of the most common pieces of writing advice you’ll get when you start out as a writer are write what you know and don’t insert yourself in the story. Essentially, you’re supposed to write about things you’re familiar with to keep your story authentic, but not too much, because then you’re just writing fanfic about yourself (or so I’ve heard). But finding that balance can be hard. Here are a few tips on how to toe the line a little more carefully.

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May Reads: THE HATE U GIVE by Angie Thomas (Review)

I’ve always supported the Black Lives Matter movement, but I’ve also always been an outsider as both a non-black person (my ethnicity is a mix of a few things, but there’s a fair amount of white in there) and someone who grew up in a ‘good’ neighbourhood. I can’t truly understand it because I’ve ever lived it and probably never will. I still don’t, but this book certainly helped a lot. It’s easy to support the movement and want justice for the black men and women killed, but understanding police brutality in the larger picture of systematic racism and its effects on society is different and much more complex. It’s easy to see supposed drug dealers and gang members as purely bad when you don’t understand the circumstances that go behind it, when you don’t know about the Khalils and DeVantes.

Read More May Reads: THE HATE U GIVE by Angie Thomas (Review)