Spider-Man: Homecoming Review (2017): A Movie for the Little Guys

Peter Parker is different. He doesn’t operate on international, galaxy-wide levels. He’s a just a fifteen-year-old kid from Brooklyn, and in turn, the movie is decidedly mortal. Peter may be genetically enhanced, thanks to that radioactive spider, but everything else is very, very mundane. Venom is just a guy with a pair of alien metal wings trying to provide for his family. Iron Man is just a dude trying to help a kid not make the mistakes he did, while making a lot of the same mistakes his father did. Peter is a nerd with a nerdy best friend who is just trying to fit in.

It’s a superhero movie, but it’s a coming-of-age film about a teenager trying to find his place in the world, too. And that’s what made it work.

Wonder Woman (2017) Movie Review: Superheroes, Complexity, and Strength

If she was anything else, Diana wouldn’t be so important. The thing is, it would’ve been easy for DC to make her too perfect, to make her a female Superman, good and righteous and pure, all the while looking breathtakingly beautiful, and charge that as feminism. But it wouldn’t feel right. We’ve been fighting for a female hero for so long, and Diana is what we deserve. She is complex and multi-dimensional and flawed, and because of that, she stands up against our favourite male superheroes. She is as good, if not better.

Brutasha Doesn’t Make the Black Widow Weak: An Age of Ultron Rant

Joss Whedon has created some of the most famous strong female characters—he wrote Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and turned Maria Hill and Melinda May and the Scarlett Witch and Agent Freaking Carter into Strong Women Role Models. And yes, maybe there’s still room for improvement in the ratio of male superheroes to female superheroes–and with female superheroes themselves–but Joss Whedon has done a whole lot for boss female characters and the girls who watch them.